risk-3576044_640One of the more important parts of my job involves risk management.  That’s why so often I end up looking like a blocker instead of a promoter.  It’s not me, honest!  It’s the job.  “Will that be a trip hazard? Are all volunteers who work with kids background-checked? You want to build a campfire where? Is cash being handled properly? Does our insurance coverage adequately address sexual abuse? Are the fire extinguishers checked regularly?  Copyright permission? Do people know not to use cell phones while driving (in general, but certainly while driving for a church errand)?  Are our hiring policies up-to-date?  Did I just accidentally download a computer virus?  What can we lose if we get attacked by ransomware?”  And on it goes. One of the ways we manage risk is to create policies (which are all on our website, off of the Board of Trustees page).  Although some of our policies are designed to help people figure out how things are done around here (examples include “Inclement Weather,” “Gift Acceptance,” “New Social Groups”), many of them are created to help manage risk.  Some of these include “Cell Phone Use,” “Childcare at UUCA,” and “Financial Policy and Procedures.” Probably the most important “risk management” policy is the one entitled, “Healthy Congregation.”  This policy lays out the whys and wherefores of being in healthy relationship with one another. To help with risk management, it also lists the steps that can be taken when an individual acts in a way that is offensive or disruptive.  It is especially attentive to adult-child relationships. As a best practice for churches, this document describes behaviors that are considered unhealthy or inappropriate, along with alternative appropriate behaviors.  It addresses physical and verbal interactions and describes various forms of bullying that will not be tolerated.  It is extremely detailed in addressing sexual abuse. This policy requires training in recognizing and preventing sexual abuse for all of our religious education teachers, with formal training programs required of all staff members.  The training that staff members have participated in this year comes from a group called Darkness2Light and is called “Stewards of Children.”  There is an online version of this course that anyone can take for $10.  It is also occasionally available as a live course in Asheville through the Buncombe Partnership for Children. The policy also is very specific about the actions we take to safeguard our children and youth in other ways, too.  All in all, this is probably the most important policy we have.  I hope you take time to read it. Linda Topp, Director of Administration