A Treasure Hunt for Resilience

This month’s Soulful Home packet invites us to reflect on resilience. Team member Teresa writes the following:
“For a people of faith, resilience is more than grit (though it can contain grit), and it’s more than good vibes (though good vibes help). Resilience is about keeping the faith together; reminding ourselves and each other of stories of courage, redemption, and community; and consciously–even playfully–cultivating tools to help us grow into our sturdy wholeness.”

The activity for this month invites us to envision resilience manifesting in several different ways in our community. We can find resilience – i.e. “come-back stories” – in the natural world, in our community offerings, in art, in public services, even in everyday objects found in many public places. With resilience in mind, can you find…

  • A fidget spinner (This fad was a huge hit in 2017! Fidget toys can help people relieve stress and calm and focus their minds.)
  • A mural or other piece of public art that makes you feel uplifted 
  • A recharging station (this can be literal or figurative)
  • A counseling office (use this opportunity to destigmatize and talk about the role of psychotherapy and counselling in helping people heal and grow)
  • Three different types of water fountains (places to step away, take a break, and rejuvenate)
  • A First-Aid kit or Defibrillator (resources to help a person recover after an emergency)
  • Glowing coals (holding the heat and ready to be blown back into a fire, perhaps?)
  • A dandelion (a most resilient wildflower who might be popping up–or laying low, close the ground–where you live!)
  • A community center (where a resilient community might offer free services to help folks socialize, move their bodies, get career or tax help, etc.)
Can you find this art work in downtown Asheville?

Exploring Integrity Through Discussions

An invitation to explore the monthly theme through a discussion for all ages. These questions are designed for family gathering – maybe during a Friday night meal, a quiet moment in the living room or before a board game night, car rides, hikes or any time you have moments when you can listen to each other.

Introducing the Activity

Family members who are readers can alternate who reads the questions. Those who are not readers are invited to share their own impromptu questions. Discussion partners might answer as thoughts come to them or take turns in a circle. 

  1. Is it more important to be right, or kind?
  2. Would you rather have friends who are always sure they are right, or who can’t make up their minds?
  3. Whom do you know who always does the right thing?
  4. On a scale from 1 to 10, how easy is it to be honest with your friends?
  5. Who taught you the most about being true to your word, or following through on what you say you’re going to do?
  6. Do you remember your first lie? How did it feel and what did it teach you?
  7. Who in your life is most “themselves”? In other words, who is least afraid to be who they are?
  8. What is one action that is always wrong? What is one action that is always right?
  9. What face do you make when you are about to do something that you know or suspect is wrong?
  10. Around whom in your life are you free to be your most complete self?
  11. How are you different from what other people think of you?
  12. What is one thing you hope is always true about you?
  13. What are the three most important pieces of you?
  14. Where is a place where all of you is accepted, where you don’t have to hide any part of yourself?

Ways to Return to the Discussion Throughout the Week 

Thoughts develop with time. Find opportunities to bring up particularly compelling questions again during the month, maybe on walks, rides home, when tucking your child in to bed, etc. If thoughts grew or changed, notice that together, how we are all evolving beings, opening ourselves to new truths and understandings as we live our lives and connect with others. 
SOURCE: Soul Matters- Soulful Home

Exploring Awe Through Discussions

Welcome to our Family Ministry blog.

Staff and I will be sharing resources to support your role as primary religious educators of your children.  We will also post future programs, multigenerational service dates and other events that might be of interest to UUCA families. We hope you like our new website and welcome your feedback on how we can make it more useful to you and your family.

Rev. Claudia

 

At the Table
Exploring Awe Through Discussions

At the Table questions explore the December monthly theme of awe through a discussion for all ages. They are designed for a family gathering – maybe during a Friday night meal, a quiet moment in the living room or before a board game night.

Introducing the Activity

Family members who are readers can alternate who reads the questions. Those who are not readers are invited to share their own impromptu questions. Discussion partners might answer as thoughts come to them or take turns in a circle.

  • Who is somebody awesome that you look up to?
  • Is awe something you can guarantee that someone else will feel?
  • Do adults and kids experience awe differently?
  • What is a movie or show that you think is awesome, but your friends find rather “meh”?
  • Would you rather be at the top of a steep, snowy mountain, or at the bottom of a massive, towering tree?
  • What are you awesome at? What are other members of your family awesome at?
  • What’s the most awesome thing your family has done together?
  • What’s the most awesome thing you’ve done by yourself?
  • Does lying on the ground in the dark staring up at the stars sound awesome or awful to you? Are night skies stunning or scary to you?
  • People sometimes know they are experiencing awe when they get goosebumps. When was the last time you got goosebumps?
  • Sometimes things that are awesome can be scary and overwhelming, like seeing a shark up close or being really high up on a bridge or in a building. What is something that you find both wonderful and terrifying at the same time?

Ways to Return to the Discussion Throughout the Month

Thoughts develop with time. Find opportunities to bring up particularly compelling questions again during the month, maybe on walks, rides home, when tucking your child in to bed, etc. If thoughts grew or changed, notice that together, how we are all evolving beings, opening ourselves to new truths and understandings as we live our lives and connect with others.

SOURCE:  Soul Home produced by the Soul Matters Team