Turning Point – A 3-session Discussion Series about the Future of Unitarian Universalism and UUCA, Mondays, February 22, March 8 and 22 at 7pm on Zoom

Do you agree or disagree?

  • We UUs are being held back and stymied by a persistent, pervasive, disturbing, and disruptive commitment to individualism that misguides our ability to engage the changing times.
  • We cling to a Unitarian Universalist exceptionalism that is often insulting to others and undermines our good news.
  • We refuse to acknowledge and treat our allergy to authority and power, though all the symptoms compromise a healthy future.

These are the claims being made in the book of essays edited by Fredric Muir called Turning Point: Essays on a new Unitarian Universalism.  The essayists then go on to suggest that renewed emphasis on generosity, pluralism, and imagination can address these “sins.”  And finally, in the third section of the book, there are examples of innovative UU programs that point us in new directions.

For these discussions, we’ll pull two or three essays from the book for each session so a full reading of the book is helpful but not necessary.  Contact James Cassara to register for the link and get the book.  Brought to you by the Leadership Development Committee.

Turning Point – A 3-session Discussion Series about the Future of Unitarian Universalism and UUCA, Mondays, February 22, March 8 and 22 at 7pm on Zoom

Do you agree or disagree?

  • We UUs are being held back and stymied by a persistent, pervasive, disturbing, and disruptive commitment to individualism that misguides our ability to engage the changing times.
  • We cling to a Unitarian Universalist exceptionalism that is often insulting to others and undermines our good news.
  • We refuse to acknowledge and treat our allergy to authority and power, though all the symptoms compromise a healthy future.

These are the claims being made in the book of essays edited by Fredric Muir called Turning Point: Essays on a new Unitarian Universalism.  The essayists then go on to suggest that renewed emphasis on generosity, pluralism, and imagination can address these “sins.”  And finally, in the third section of the book, there are examples of innovative UU programs that point us in new directions.

For these discussions, we’ll pull two or three essays from the book for each session so a full reading of the book is helpful but not necessary.  Contact James Cassara to register for the link and get the book.  Brought to you by the Leadership Development Committee.